Category: Social Justice

Report: Climate Change Poised to Deprive the Poor of Clean Water

To mark World Water Day on March 22, WaterAid released its State of the World’s Water report, warning that because of climate change, the world’s poorest communities will face an even tougher struggle for access to clean water. Countries ranking highest in population without access to clean water also rank high in vulnerability to climate change and low in their ability to adapt to it. “Extreme weather events resulting from climate change can mean more storm surges, flooding, droughts and contaminated water sources. They can wipe out fragile infrastructure, dry up rivers, ponds and springs, and contribute to the spread of waterborne diseases making an already difficult...

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These are the 20 Worst-Paying Jobs for Women in the U.S.

The role of women in America’s workplace has changed drastically over the last several decades.  In the late 60’s, women made up about one-third of the country’s workforce, compared to present day where women make up nearly half. Yet on the heels of the 100-year-anniversary of the women’s right to vote, females in this country still do not receive equal pay as men. The current political climate has once again pushed the gender wage gap issue into the spotlight. Recently 24/7 Wall St. conducted a review and identified the top 20 worst paying jobs for women, garnering information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics about...

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Albinos are being Hunted by Witch Doctors for their Body Parts

Witch doctors use body parts of people with albinism in various rituals, which has led to a “clandestine market for body parts,” an independent expert on albinism reported to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva. Witch doctors participate in traditional medicine, which includes muti or juju; however, this particular practice—using the body parts of people with albinism—is all too common. The independent expert, Ikponwosa Ero, urged the UN to enact additional oversight of traditional healers in the report she issued on Saturday. “Persons with albinism are amongst the most vulnerable persons in the region,” Ero stated in an earlier...

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Survey: Nearly Half of Women and Children on Mediterranean Migration Route are Raped

Two million refugees arrived in Europe between 2015 and 2016, many fleeing wars, extreme poverty or dictatorships in their home countries. It is a long and dangerous journey trying to cross the Mediterranean sea, and countless numbers of refugees lose their lives doing so. Others have to stop for days on end where countries, such as Hungary, have built borders to prevent immigrants from entering. Hundreds of thousands are left stranded for months at refugee camps in Greece and Italy. Many of these immigrants are women and children.  According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), since 2014, the number...

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New Sundresses Give Orphans and Underprivileged Girls the Chance to ‘Feel Beautiful’

Orphans from the Philippines and underprivileged girls from Illinois received 50 handmade sundresses from Stitching a Legacy, a nonprofit organization created by McKara Caldwell, a 17-year-old girl from Sherrard, Illinois, in October of last year. With the help of life insurance company Royal Neighbors of America (RNA) and its program Difference Maker Fund (DMF), Caldwell was given a $200 dollar mini-grant to showcase her sundresses in a fashion show and later donated them to the above-mentioned girls. Caldwell and a host of volunteers raced against the clock to create the sundresses to model on the runway. This was done...

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Man-Made Famine Puts 1.4 Million Children at ‘Imminent Risk of Death’

The United Nations International Children’s Fund warns that roughly 1.4 million children are at risk of dying as famine threatens Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. The United Nations (UN) had already made a formal declaration of famine in parts of South Sudan on Monday, where 20,000 children live.  Within the next year, severe acute malnutrition is expected to affect 450,000 children in Nigeria, 270,000 in Somalia, more than 270,000 in Sudan, and over 462,000 in Yemen. By the time the UN declares famine, the death rate for children under the age of 5 is already higher than 4 deaths per...

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Make Someone’s Day Brighter With The Random Act Of Kindness Generator

Whether it’s a compliment from a coworker or having your coffee paid for by the person ahead of you in line, small acts of kindness have an amazing ability to lift your mood. This week marks the 17th Annual Random Act of Kindness Week — a week completely dedicated to altruism. The Random Act of Kindness Organization (RAK) started celebrating this week in 2000 as an opportunity to “unite through kindness,” according to a press release. RAK week is observed Feb 12-18 each year. This year, RAK is launching a “Kindness Generator,” which creates kindness “challenges” for individuals, organizations, companies,...

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Immigrants to the U.S. Honored for their Outstanding Contributions

On February 3, 2017, the Vilcek Foundation awarded its annual Vilcek Prize to immigrants who have made extraordinary achievements in the fields of biomedical sciences and the arts. “Like all great artists and scientists, these immigrant prizewinners challenge our very perceptions of the world,” said Rick Kinsel, president of the Vilcek Foundation, in a statement. “Their works are attempts to understand fundamental questions and concepts in American society, from the neurological underpinnings of the self to the institution of democracy.” In a time when nationalism is at full gallop — and immigrants are often eyed with suspicion — the Vilcek...

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