Today is Super Tuesday, a day when eleven states award delegates to Democratic and Republican candidates—delegates that will soon choose their party’s nominees at the conventions this July. It’s a big day that will help decide whether Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders will become the democratic nominee.

The race is on, but it’s not over yet. While many believe this Tuesday could be a make or break for Sanders, he’s said that he will run until all fifty states have spoken. After all, by the end of today only fifteen states out of fifty will have had their primaries.

So with the states counting down and the delegates adding up, it’s time for another look at the two left hopefuls and a few big issues that highlight their greatest differences.

Note: All statements below have been sourced and summarized directly from each candidates’ official campaign website and official links.

Climate Change and Clean Energy

Clinton says she will:

  • Generate enough renewable energy to power every home in America
  • Install half a billion solar panels installed by the end of her first term.
  • Cut energy waste in American homes, schools, hospitals and offices by a third
  • Reduce American oil consumption by a third
  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 30 percent in 2025
  • Work toward cutting emissions more than 80 percent by 2050.
  • Create the $60 billion Clean Energy Challenge, to partnering with states, cities, and rural communities to cut carbon pollution and expand clean energy. The Clean Energy Challenge will also encourage solar and energy efficiency investments in low-income communities.
  • Invest in clean energy infrastructure, innovation, manufacturing and workforce development through a comprehensive plan to make the existing energy infrastructure cleaner and safer.
  • Reform fossil fuel leasing of public lands, expand clean energy.
  • End wasteful tax subsidies for oil and gas companies, invest in clean energy.
  • Cut methane emissions by 40-45 percent
  • Revitalize coal communities through a $30 billion plan

Sanders says he will:

  • Cut U.S. carbon pollution by 40 percent by 2030 and by over 80 percent by 2050 by taxing carbon pollution, removing fossil fuel subsidies, and investing in sustainable energy such as wind and solar power.
  • Institute the carbon tax on polluters causing the climate crisis, “and return billions of dollars to working families to ensure the fossil fuel companies don’t subject us to unfair rate hikes.”
  • Ban fossil fuels lobbyists from the White House and unlimited super PAC donations by the fossil fuel industry
  • Create a national environmental and climate justice plan to aid low-income and minority communities facing climate change disasters like Hurricane Katrina
  • Eliminate tax breaks for big oil, gas, and coal companies, repealing loopholes and tax subsidies in the federal tax code “benefitting oil, natural gas, and coal special interests, saving $135 billion over the next decade. This revenue would be used to help create a clean-energy workforce of 10 million good-paying jobs by creating a 100% clean energy system.”
  • Close the loopholes that allow the chemical, oil and gas industries to pollute our air and water.
  • Create clean, domestic energy alternatives for the transportation sector
  • Increase fuel economy standards to 65 miles per gallon by 2025.
  • Ban Arctic oil drilling, fracking for natural gas, offshore drilling and dirty pipeline projects like the Keystone XL.
  • Stop exports of liquefied natural gas and crude oil.
  • Ban mountaintop removal coal mining and invest in Appalachian communities
  • Protect public lands by promoting natural resource conservation and habitat preservation.
  • Invest in advanced renewable fuels and clean technologies like solar, wind, cellulosic ethanol and algae-based fuels that promote energy independence
  • Start a moratorium on nuclear power plant license renewals in the United States.
  • Build electric vehicle charging stations and high-speed passenger and cargo rail, updating the infrastructure to create significant cuts in carbon pollution emissions
  • Convene a climate summit with the world’s best experts his first 100 days.
  • Lead countries in cutting climate change and proposing solutions worldwide
  • Introduce a “plan for peace” to avoid international climate-fueled conflict.

The difference:

While Clinton’s plan(s) are highly detailed with a ton of concrete goals, the focus of her climate change and clean energy platform seems to be on improving existing infrastructures and establishing new renewable infrastructures. Meanwhile, Bernie Sanders platform has a comprehensive discussion on fossil fuels and their persistence despite scientific agreement that they are a prime cause of climate change. He notes that the reason we have not solved this issue is because “executives and lobbyists for coal, oil, and gas companies have blocked every attempt to make progress on climate change.” His plan also focuses on ending our dependence on fossil fuels, citing significant investment in the transportation sector. Clinton, meanwhile, does not discuss the transportation in the same level of detail, focusing instead on energy efficiency and job creation in the public sector.

Healthcare for Americans

Clinton says she will:

  • Defend and expand the Affordable Care Act that created Obamacare
  • Add a “public option” for insurance under the ACA
  • Use existing legislation the growth of out-of-pocket costs and expand coverage for Americans
  • Work on lowering prescription drug prices
  • Incentivize states to expand Medicaid, coverage for families regardless of immigration status, invest in activities that promote enrollment

Sanders says he will:

  • Create a federally administered single-payer health care program that covers “the entire continuum of health care, from inpatient to outpatient care; preventive to emergency care; primary care to specialty care, including long-term and palliative care; vision, hearing and oral health care; mental health and substance abuse services; as well as prescription medications, medical equipment, supplies, diagnostics and treatments.”
  • Fund the plan through 1) a 6.2 percent income-based health care premium paid by employers; 2) a 2.2 percent income-based premium paid by households; 3) through revenue from income tax reform, estate tax reform, capital gains tax reform, high-earner tax deductions reform, and savings from health tax expenditures.

The difference:

Clinton’s platform is all about expanding and improving existing legislation—the Affordable Care Act—to move toward universal coverage and more affordable premiums and drug prices. Her plan includes many initiatives that will help keep Obamacare intact and ensure that the underinsured and the uninsured get covered. Bernie Sanders, however, promotes a plan that would establish an entirely new universal single-payer healthcare system, paid for by an income-based premium tax paid both by employers and households, as well as revenue from a host of other tax reforms that require high-earners pay progressively according to their income.

Issue: Money and Special Interests in Politics

Clinton says she will:

  • Overturn Citizens United
  • Only appoint Supreme Court Justices who will overturn Citizen United.
  • Push for legislation that requires “outside groups” to disclose any substantial political spending
  • Sign an executive order requiring federal government contractors to disclose big political spending
  • Promote an SEC rule requiring publicly traded companies to disclose political spending to shareholders.
  • Establish a small-donor matching system for presidential and congressional elections to incentivize small donors to participate in elections

Sanders says he will:

  • Overturn Citizens United
  • Only appoint Supreme Court Justices who will overturn Citizen United.
  • Fight for a fair, transparent publicly financed system of campaign financing that amplifies small donations, along the lines of the Fair Elections Now Act (he is co-sponsor)
  • Introduce legislation that requires complete transparency of campaign funding, including disclosure of contributions to outside spending groups, action by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Federal Election Commission, and Federal Communication Commission, and an executive order requiring government contractors to disclose their political spending.
  • Work to eliminate super PACs
  • Aggressively enforce campaign finance rules.

The difference:

While both Clinton and Sanders promise to overturn Citizens United, as Senator, Bernie Sanders has filed a constitutional amendment to do so. He introduced it first in 2013 and renewed it again in January 2015. Both candidates want to introduce legislation and support efforts to regulate big money in politics, while bolstering small donations that encourage civic participation and engagement, however, Bernie Sanders mentions eliminating “Super PACs” while Hillary Clinton does not. Clinton’s platform is focused on improving the current system through reform, while Sanders’ platform is more about restructuring and introducing new legislation.

Issue: Financial Regulation and Wall Street Reform

Issue: Financial Regulation and Wall Street Reform

Clinton says she will:

  • Defend and enforce the Dodd-Frank Act passed in 2010 by President Obama
  • Impose a scalable risk fee every year on the liabilities of banks with more than $50 billion in assets and other financial institutions that are designated by regulators for enhanced oversight
  • Pursue legislation to enhance regulators’ authorities under Dodd-Frank
  • Strengthen oversight of “shadow banking” system
  • Impose a high-frequency trading tax [amount not specified]
  • Hold both individuals and corporations accountable to law-breaking in the financial sector

Sanders says he will:

  • Reform the corporate tax code that currently allows over $100 billion in revenue lost “because corporations stash their cash in offshore tax havens around the world”
  • Reform and establish a more progressive estate tax for the wealthiest 0.3 percent of Americans who inherit more than $3.5 million. The first $3.5 million is tax-free.
  • Introduce a tax on Wall Street speculators, including investment houses, hedge funds, and other speculators at the rate of 0.5 percent for stocks, 0.1 percent for bonds, and 0.005. The proceeds will fund universal college education.
  • Introduce a 15% cap on interest rates for credit cards and consumer loans.
  • Cap all ATM fees at $2
  • Co-sponsoring Sen. Tammy Baldwin’s bill to end Wall Street’s practice of paying big bonuses to bank executives who take senior-level government jobs.
  • Sponsored an amendment calling for an audit the Federal Reserve. The audit found that far more had been spent in the Wall Street bailout than previously disclosed, and that considerable funds had been spent to bail out foreign corporations.

The difference.

While Clinton is set on enforcing and building on the foundations of Dodd-Frank, Bernie Sanders seems in favor of introducing new legislation that both regulates and taxes Wall Street speculation and high-net worth individuals. Additionally, Clinton’s platform talks extensively about prosecuting and individuals (supervisors and senior executives) who have committed corporate “wrong-doing” or “egregious crimes” such as financial fraud or insider trading. Sanders’ platform, however, focuses more on closing existing loopholes that allow U.S. companies and corporations to avoid taxes and simply not pay their fair share. The tax revenue, he says, will fund many of his social programs.

Issue: College Education

Clinton says she will:

  • Introduce the New College Compact plan, which will 1) award grants to states and colleges for student tuition and living expenses at public 4-year colleges; 2) provide free tuition at community colleges; 3) support private non-profit colleges; 4) relieve student debt for students who enter national service; 5) relieve interest on student debt; 6) decrease interest rates and allow refinancing at lowest rates.
  • Fund the $350 billion 10-year ($35 billion annually) plan through “closing tax loopholes and expenditures of the most fortunate.”

Sanders says he will:

  • Make education at public colleges and universities free, something that already exists in other advanced nations
  • Prevent the federal government from profiting on student loans
  • Substantially cut student loan interest rates (he gives the example of how they would drop from 29% to just 2.37% if the plan were in effect today)
  • Allow refinancing of student loans at the market’s lowest interest rates
  • Require public colleges and universities to meet 100% of the financial needs of the lowest-income students. Allowing them use of federal, state and college financial aid to cover room and board, books and living expenses.
  • Triple the federal work study program
  • Fund the $75 billion per year education plan through a tax on Wall Street speculation

The difference:

While both candidates want to eliminate the burden of student loan debts and lower student interest rates, Clinton wants to make public college more affordable, while Sanders wants to make it universally free. Clinton’s plan provides grants to states and institutions to distribute funds, and would institute a range of reforms and tightening up legislation to ensure that students, families and schools could meet the cost of education. Her plan is mapped out over ten years, costing $35 billion annually. Meanwhile Sanders’ plan would introduce universal free public college and university education, plus financial coverage for low-income students out-of-pocket expenses like books and living costs. His plan creates a Wall Street speculation tax that would fund the $75 billion annual plan for universal free college education. In short, Clinton’s program works with the existing system, while Sanders’ program revolutionizes it.

The Results:

While these are just a handful of the issues, they help to illustrate what has been characterized as the biggest difference between the candidates: their methods.

Clinton is all about “getting things done” and working with the legislation, programs, and initiatives that are already on the table. She’s pragmatic in the sense of proposing solutions that work within the structure of our current system.

Bernie Sanders’ method, however, is all about revolutionizing our current system and starting anew. Rather than working with what we have to achieve the best possible outcome, Bernie’s platform is about “creating a movement” that empowers Americans to participate in government and holds official accountable to the people. He calls for a sharp break away from the status quo.

As Bryce Covert recently wrote in the New York Times, the difference between Clinton and Sanders lies in their theories of how to get things done. “It’s the difference between working the system (Clinton) and smashing it (Sanders).”

In short, you might say Hillary Clinton is excellent at playing the game and getting things done. She knows the rules and how to achieve results. Bernie Sanders, however, doesn’t agree with the game in the first place, citing the rules as unfair and the outcomes rigged. He wants to rewrite the rulebook and start a new game, where everyone has a fair chance of winning.

The good news: no matter who wins, America will be looking at a fine Democratic presidential candidate.